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Nutritional Yeast

topic posted Fri, October 5, 2007 - 11:24 PM by  Susan
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I have some nutritional yeast that has been sitting in my cupboard for an embarassing length of time. It looks and smells ok, but I don't know if I dare to use it.

Does anybody know if nutritional yeast goes bad, and if it does, how to tell if it has?
posted by:
Susan
Utah
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  • Unsu...
     
    Sorry, Susan, I've never had it around long enough to see what it looks/smells like when it's gone bad. But I know it has a shelf life of 18 months if stored in a cool dry place, if that helps you at all. :O)
    • Unsu...
       
      as long as it was in a dry place as Sassy said and away from direct sunlight it should be still good.
      If it was in direct sunlight there may not be many nutrients left in it but it may not be bad per se.
      taste a bit on your tonge, if it still has flavour use it.
      if it tastes stale and dry, chuck it.
      I can't imagine having that problem with nutritional yeast as I use mine so fast that I don't even have time to fill up the spice jar ;-)
      literally! a bag of nutritional yeast is on my weekly shopping list ;-)
      • Speaking of which, does someone want to give me the run down on nutritional yeast? Is it just the dried orgaisms? Do you get anything besides B vitamins? Any other info would be great.
        • its got tons of vitamins, not just B... like: potassium, dietary fiber, protein, B-1, B-2, B-3, B-6, folic acid, B-12, biotin, pantothenic aid, phosphorus, magnesium, zin, selenium, copper, manganese, molybdenum, etc. (just reading from the side of my can)

          you can just mix it with juice, or into smoothies, whatever, to use as a nutritional supplement. we also put it on like, baked potatoes, popcorn, gnochi, spaghetti, whatever. heres a good gravy recipe:

          2 tbsp vegan margarine
          4-6 button mushrooms, finely chopped
          3 tbsp flour
          1 tbsp nutritional yeast
          1/4 tsp black pepper
          1 tsp tamari
          1 cup vegetable stock

          saute mushrooms in margarine
          add flour, yeast, pepper, tamari, stirring constantly until thick
          add stock 1/4 cup at a time, stirring constantly
          blend if you want it smooth (we usually just whisk and its fine)

          goes great with crispy fried tofu:
          1 lb extra firm tofu (drained, frozen, thawed, pressed)
          1 cup flour
          1/4 cup nutritional yeast
          1/2 tsp salt
          dash pepper
          1/2 tsp garlic powder
          1/2 tsp dried basil (optional)
          1 cup soy sauce
          oil for frying

          drain, freeze the tofu at least a day beforehand
          cut tofu into strips ~1.5" x 3"
          mix dry ingredients together in large bowl
          soak tofu in soy sauce
          cover soaked tofu in the dry flour mixture
          fry it up! about 30-40 seconds each side

          holy crap this stuff is so tasty
          • and here's a good "cheese" sauce:

            1/2 cup nutritional yeast
            2 tbsp flour
            1/2 tsp salt
            1 cup water
            2 tsp oil
            1 1/2 tsp dijon mustard
            1 1/2 tsp tamari

            whisk all ingredients together in small saucepan
            bring to boil, reduce heat
            simmer for 2-4 minutes while stirring

            you can add jalapenos or some kind of peppers to that to make it spicey

            shout out to sarah kramer :P i get most of my recipes from her awesome books (this one was from La Dolce Vegan!)
          • Hey matt -

            Thanks for the nutrition info and recipes. Your version of fried tofu sounds a bit better than mine - I'll be trying it out soon. :)

            I'm curious though... you said "(just reading from the side of my can)"
            Can?? Really?
            I've only ever (seen) bought the flakes in bulk. What brand cans it?
            While I will most likely continue to buy it bulk I must admit I'm curious about the pre-packaged kind.

            Thx!
            • The company Marigold who do Bouillon powder do it in containers that are pretty much the same as the tubs that the bouillon comes in except bigger (and dark grey with an orange top). These aren't really cans but they're rather can-like, and language is a funny thing.
              • And they do it under the name "Engevita". Doesn't suprise me, I always thought the name "nutritional yeast flakes" makes it sound like the most unapetising thing ever!
              • Thanks Wombat!

                Cans/containers... whatever word is used it's the point of being pre-packaged that I hadn't been familiar with (though it makes sense that it would be) since I'd only ever been aware of it in bulk.

                A quick Google search directed me to the Marigold site and the nutritional info page: www.marigoldhealthfoods.com/Enge....html
                The product info page comments:
                "To preserve valuable vitamins it is advisable not to heat to 100ยบ C"
                Now I'm curious if this applies to all nutritional yeast or just this brand/variety...? I love to cook with it where it requires high heat above boiling temperature. This site is the only place I've found mention of nutrition loss when heated.

                Further search found Red Star brand yeast ("Vegetarian Support Formula") and their nutritional info page: www.bulkfoods.com/nutritional_yeast.htm
                I believe this to the the brand I've purchased from my natural grocer's bulk bin.
                They also have a list of various yeasts near the bottom of this page ( www.bulkfoods.com/yeast.htm ) which I found interesting as well.


                Further curiosity regarding B12 led me to another site ( www.vegetarian-restaurants.net/Ot...b12 ) where I found this quote:

                "There are many forms of B12, but Cyanocobalamin is the form that the body can use. Therefore even if some foods are high in other forms of B12, they are usually of no value for a person. Some foods that may appear to be good sources of B12 are not and these include nutritional yeast, bean sprouts, tempeh, sea vegetables, tamari (fermented soy sauce) and miso (fermented soy).

                Most forms of nutritional yeast contain B12 that has no value, but the brand Red Star T-6635+ contains B12 that can be utilized. It has been made to contain Cyanocobalimin."


                Anyway... I found all this info to be interesting and thought some of you might as well... and I love sharing info links.
                Some of the sites noted above also provide links to recipes, too, fyi.
  • I honestly have never done much with nutritional yeast. I bought this a while back, used it in a couple of recipes, and then threw it in the back of a cupboard and forgot about it.

    Anyone willing to share their favorite nutritional yeast recipes? I would like to experiment with it a bit more.
    • "Anyone willing to share their favorite nutritional yeast recipes?"

      Certainly!
      Aside from sprinkling it on popcorn and spaghetti (a great replacement for parmesan cheese!), my all-time favorite recipe is for a vegan mac'n'cheese. This recipe is DEEE-frickin-LICIOUS! I've been making it for years, served it to many from vegan to omnivore, and have yet to find a taste bud that disagrees with its delectability.

      Note : This is not my recipe but one I got from a friend. I am uncertain of its origins, if he made it up or got the recipe elsewhere, but it's posted on his site and definitely has his sense of humor written into the directions... www.waste.org/~oxymoron/r...ncheese.html



      ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
      WASTE Mac'n'Cheese
      (which contains absolutely no cheese, natch)

      - - - - - - - - - -
      Ingredients
      - - - - - - - - - -
      3 cups macaroni
      1/2 cup margarine
      1/2 cup flour
      2 tsp salt
      2 tsp garlic powder
      a pinch of turmeric
      2 tbsp good shoyu or tamari soy sauce
      1 cup nutritional yeast flakes
      1/4 cup oil
      1 or 2 peppers, chopped (we prefer Annaheims) optional
      Paprika to taste

      - - - - - - - - -
      Directions
      - - - - - - - - -
      Preheat oven to 350F.

      Start boiling water in a pot for macaroni. Add a pinch of salt, but no oil. Oil is wrong. Also start boiling exactly 3 cups of water in a teapot for making the sauce.

      Measure out ingredients while waiting for water to boil. Or stand around like an idiot and then panic later. Your choice. What? You didn't read this far until after the water was boiling? Fool.

      When water is boiling, begin cooking macaroni, stirring occassionally. You can turn down the teapot when it starts to boil, cuz you won't need it for a couple minutes yet.

      In a medium saucepan, melt margarine over medium heat. Whisk in flour. When it has reached an even, bubbly consistency, whisk in boiling water from teapot. Reduce heat to low. Stir until smooth again and add garlic, salt, turmeric, and soy sauce. Then fold in nutritional yeast flakes and oil and stir until smooth. If you just added a cup of nutritional yeast powder or, worse yet, brewer's yeast, you've probably just made your dinner inedible. Eat it anyway as punishment for not following directions. Mix the peppers in.

      If your timing is good, the macaroni should be finished now. When it's done, drain it in a colander and shake the excess water out quickly. Pour all the macaroni back into the pot, then mix in the sauce. Don't burn yourself on the pot or you'll feel stupid. You could use a fancy casserole dish or something, but that's just one more dish to clean. Whatever. It's your dinner, do it however you want. Sprinkle paprika on top.

      Cook for 15 minutes at 350F and then for 5 minutes on "broil". Don't sit around. Wash the dishes while you're waiting - that saucepan will be hard to clean later. Might as well put away all the ingredients you left out too. Serve with fresh-ground pepper, maybe some diced tomato, even some sprouts. Do not serve with ketchup, broccoli, or veggie franks unless you're some sort of freak. Freak.

      ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

      YUM!
      • >>>Do not serve with ketchup, broccoli, or veggie franks unless you're some sort of freak. Freak.<<<

        lol

        thanks for that recipe! i'm totally going to try it tonight, it looks bomb. mac & cheese rawks!
  • Nutritional Yeast grows on molasses, then it is harvested and pasteurized to kill the yeast. For this reason, people with candidia issues tolerate it very well.

    I like it when I make Raw Vegan Cheese (although Nutritional Yeast is not Raw) because it imparts a cheese flavor, but I don't like it plain, in water as a supplement or sprinkled on things. Tastes kind of like "wood" to me...but my mom loves it!

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